Cleveland Deportation Defense Attorney

What to Do After Receiving a Notice to Appear

When immigration officials determine that there are grounds to deport an individual from this country, the Department of Homeland Security files a notice to appear with the immigration court. This notice is then served to the alien, who is often shocked to learn of the matter. If you find yourself in this situation, then you have cause to feel great concern. You are at risk of being removed from the United States, separated from your friends and family, and deprived of everything you have worked so hard to achieve in this country. The first action you should take after being served with a notice to appear is to contact a skilled immigration attorney who can advise you of your legal options and help you take immediate action to resolve the situation.

When you contact Robert Brown LLC for help, an attorney from our firm will be ready to meet with you for a initial consultation to discuss your concerns and begin working on a strategy for your case. You cannot afford any delay in getting started - the immigration authorities have already decided to have you deported and they are actively working to carry out the action as quickly as possible.

With our help, you may be able to prevent the deportation and perhaps even secure a more favorable outcome, such as becoming a lawful permanent resident. The key is to call or visit us as early as possible so that we have adequate time to develop your case. Our team includes a Martindale-Hubbell® AV®-Rated Ohio deportation defense lawyer and two attorneys who have been included in the list of Super Lawyers® Rising Stars, and we know how to get results for our clients!

Cancellation of Removal

If you have been convicted of certain types of crime, you may be eligible for cancellation of removal, which involves two separate approaches depending on whether you are a lawful permanent resident (LPR) or whether you are in this country on a non-immigrant visa. In the first case, you must have been an LPR for at least five years, must have resided in this country for at least seven years, and must not have been convicted of an aggravated felony.

If you are a non-immigrant alien, then you may qualify for cancellation if you have been in this country for ten continuous years, have been a person of good moral character, and have not been convicted of certain crimes. You must additionally be able to demonstrate that your deportation would cause exceptional and extremely unusual hardship to a spouse, parent, or child who is a U.S. citizen or LPR.

Deportation Defense in Cleveland, Columbus, and Cincinnati

There are several additional strategies for defending against removal proceedings. One is to petition for a waiver of inadmissibility, which has the power of nullifying the conditions that make you ineligible for immigration. You could have grounds to seek asylum if you have a well-founded fear of persecution in your home country based on your religion, race, nationality, social group, or political opinion. If you have a family member or employer who can sponsor you in a green card application, then you may be able to become an LPR by applying for adjustment of status. In the event that your initial attempts at preventing deportation are unsuccessful, we may still be able to take your case before the Board of Immigration Appeals, which has authority over the immigration courts in the United States. No matter how challenging your case may be, we will not hesitate to fight to defend your rights and help you avoid the disastrous consequences you face.

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